rkitect

rkitect

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Home page: http://revittotd.com/

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Posts by rkitect

Never again…

When it comes to Revit, theories on workflow and implementation change on what seems to be a weekly and sometimes daily basis depending how deep into the rabbit hole you are. One such implementation strategy that I’ve long held to is teach the people how to detail first. This covers all flavors of sin in Revit including the use of Lineworks Tool, Cut Profile and Masking Regions… let’s start with that one: Masking Regions.

I swear I will never, EVER, tach someone to use Masking Region tool ever again! I’m just so tired of spending hours modeling a portion of a building, only to have an elevation or detail of that model “fixed” at the last minute with a Masking Region instead of just coordinating and saying “hey we need it this way now.” I have officially worked on too many projects where this happens and we end up with a different model than detail.

Who cares about the model right? Wake up people! AIA contract wording is changing! The model is a viable deliverable method these days. If you want to generate those RFIs, go right ahead and keep doing it this way. If you want your details to read differently than the Model of the Building that contains all the Information, then I suggest you consider a program called MS Paint; it has line tools and and text. On the other hand, if you think that the view you are using to document the model should actually reflect what the model has to say about your project, and you’re still using Masking Regions (or heavens forbid an Opaque White Filled Region) to modify your views, I would highly suggest you seriously look at the Revit User’s Manual in regards to detail tools and sit down and really figure out how to get the model to look that way (some TotDs will be coming up on this, hopefully sooner than later!)

Till then,

Revit TotD – 1.24.2012 | How to get PDFs from consultants into Revit

This was an interesting question brought to me often from all sides of the firm; administrative, marketing, project management, specs, etc. “Can Revit bring a PDF into the project?” Now, there’s probably two reasons you are here reading this article right now. 1) You REALLY don’t want to use Autodesk’s native format, DWFx for some stupid reason. 2) You were too lazy to ask your consultant for an AutoCAD, or heaven forbid a Revit, file to coordinate from. Cause let’s face it, you didn’t REALLY think I was about to tell you how to bring a PDF file into Revit… did you?.. You did? I pity you.

Why is it that you would rather bring a PDF that is basically an encapsulation file of whatever format it’s actually in (ie: jpg, gif, txt, etc) instead of just bringing in the image, text or whatever it is? I can’t even begin to tell you how many times I’ve been asked if PDFs can be brought in to Revit to find that the user was trying to import a PDF of a cad file!!!… !!!!!!! REALLY?! GET THE CAD FILE!!!

OVERHAULIN’

Is it a SOPA violation? I’ll let you decide. It’s really in regards to some major changes coming up regarding RevitTotD. In attempt to become a more involved blogger I’m going to be making a few changes around the shop. For now, I’m concentrating my latest project which has kept me quite busy recently! Until then, know that I haven’t completely disappeared and DO plan on making some new posts in the near future!

 

TCHUS!

Revit TotD – 12.13.2011 | Quick Shortcut Share

Protip #… oh I forget. Change your keyboard shortcuts for the folowing:

Select All Instances: In Entire View - SSA
Select All Instances: Visible in View - SA

Cause let’s face it, every time you hit “SA” you meant to select everything in that view! 😉

More to come, even if it is small things like this. I making a come back, promise!

Revit Interface Class outline

So I’m teaching a quick class on the Revit Interface in my office and I thought I would post the class outline in case anyone wanted a reference guide or something to use as a start for a similar training class at their office. Enjoy and feel free to comment! If you use it, please do the nice thing and at least give me credit 🙂

LnL Series_Interface01_11.2.2011

RevitCity chat… INSIDE OF REVIT!

Um.. again.. kinda. This one is much less user friendly because of the authentication protocol that has to happen on RevitCity.com’s side. However, it IS possible! Here’s how!

  1. If you haven’t already, go read this post and read the first 4 steps to create the module (or the whole post if you want a chat connection to RevitTotD.com’s chat also!)
  2. In Revit, go to the Manage Ribbon > Macro Panel > Manage Macros
  3. Click Application tab at the top. This ensures you have the Macro anytime you open Revit.
  4. Select the Chat Module and then choose Create > Macro on the right.
  5. Name this something like the following, and be sure you have “Macro In:” set to the module you just created.
  6. Clicking OK will launch the VSTA interface.
  7. Add a Window Form. (Project > Windows Form)
  8. Name it frmRevitCityChat, click Add.
  9. From the Toolbox on the left, add a Toolbox > All Windows Forms > Web Browser. (If the toolbox isn’t showing, click View > Toolbox) Do this by simply dragging the Web Browser into the form you just made. You know it has added if you see a scroll bar in your form now and a white background instead of a grey background.
  10. Double click the Title bar that says “frmRevitTotDChat” and the code view will open. Make you code look like this:

    Public Class frmRevitTotDChat
    Private Sub frmRevitTotDChat_Load(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    WebBrowser1.Navigate("http://revitcity.com/login.php")
    End Sub
    End Class

  11. Go to the ThisApplication.vb tab and find the line that start with “Public Sub RevitTotDChat()” and make it look like this:

    Public Sub RevitChat()
    Dim myFrm As New frmRevitChat
    myFrm.Show()
    End Sub

  12. Run the Macro, Hit Stop, Close VSTA.
  13. Double click your new macro. You’ll need to expand the size of the window, until you see the Username and Password forms. Fill that in (you will need to register first if you are not a RevitCity.com user already) and click Login.
  14. Close that window and open the Macro Manager again. Select the macro we just made and click Edit.
  15. In the Project Explorer on the right, double click “frmRevitCityChat.vb
  16. Double click the Title Bar that says “frmRevitCityChat” and edit the URL to read like this instead of what is there:

    Public Class frmRevitTotDChat
    Private Sub frmRevitTotDChat_Load(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    WebBrowser1.Navigate("http://revitcity.com/chat/index.php")
    End Sub
    End Class

  17. Run the Macro, Hit Stop, Close VSTA.
  18. Double click the macro again. This time you’ll see the Chat form. You will need to resize the window to see the whole thing. See you there!

Now, there are a couple of issues with this. Any command key (ie: shift, tab, delete, etc) that you have set up as a Shortcut Key will not work in the text input but instead will try to start the revit command it is tied to. This includes Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V for copy pasting, but you can still use right click copy/paste method. Also, it appears as though Private Messages will not work properly using this (which some veteran users may find comforting). Enjoy!

RevitTotD Chat.. INSIDE OF REVIT!

Well, kinda. It uses a webInterface which is basically a .net wrapper for Internet Explorer. This bit of code was made by joseguia over at RevitForum.org and I am eternally thankful for it! Here’s a quick tutorial on how to set it up. The advantage of this is that it is actually a Revit window, so it is one step closer to actually working instead of having Internet Explorer open (although technically you still have IE open by running this macro).

  1. In Revit, go to the Manage Ribbon > Macro Panel > Manage Macros
  2. Click Application tab at the top. This ensures you have the Macro anytime you open Revit.
  3. On the right of the Macro Manager, under Create, click Module.
  4. Name this new module appropriately, I named it RevitChat, and choose VB.NET for the language. Give it a good description like a responsible programmer.
  5. You could just edit this and call it a day, but I’ll have another tutorial later this week for another chat room that you can do the same thing with! So instead, select the Module you just created and then choose Create > Macro on the right. This time you are creating one little program for our Module.
  6. Name this something like the following, and be sure you have “Macro In:” set to the module you just created.
  7. Clicking OK will launch the VSTA interface. DON’T PANIC! It gets easier from here.
  8. Add a Window Form. (Project > Windows Form)
  9. Name it frmRevitTotDChat, click Add.
  10. From the Toolbox on the left, add a Toolbox > All Windows Forms > Web Browser. (If the toolbox isn’t showing, click View > Toolbox) Do this by simply dragging the Web Browser into the form you just made. You know it has added if you see a scroll bar in your form now and a white background instead of a grey background.
  11. Double click the Title bar that says “frmRevitTotDChat” and the code view will open. Make you code look like this:Public Class frmRevitTotDChat

    Private Sub frmRevitTotDChat_Load(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    WebBrowser1.Navigate("http://gibsonhh.info:9090/?nick=YOURNICKHERE&channels=Revit")
    End Sub
    End Class

  12. Go to the ThisApplication.vb tab and find the line that start with “Public Sub RevitTotDChat()” and make it look like this:

    Public Sub RevitChat()
    Dim myFrm As New frmRevitChat
    myFrm.Show()
    End Sub


  13. Run the Macro, Hit Stop, Close VSTA.
  14. Double click your new macro. See you in chat!

Now, there are a couple of issues with this. Any command key (ie: shift, tab, delete, etc) that you have set up as a Shortcut Key will not work in the text input but instead will try to start the revit command it is tied to. This includes Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V for copy pasting, but you can still use right click copy/paste method. Enjoy!

Revit TotD – 5.12.2011 | Immediate, Extended and RHSC Families 2.1

In case you aren’t up on your abbreviations, that’s Red Headed Step Child, keeping in mind and continuing the whole family theme. Today is going to be yet another rather dry TotD that continues to prepare us novice Family creators on our journey into full family parenthood. So let’s delve further into family creation by examining the different types of families as well as some behaviors of the different categories.

So there’s three basic things you should get out of today’s TotD.

System Families

These are the immediate family members of your Revit project. They are always in the project no matter how hard you try to get rid of them, one will always be there. A good example of these families are your Assembly Families: Walls, Roofs, Floors, Ceilings, Stairs, Rails, Curtain Walls, etc. You can not delete all types of a System Family from a project! Kinda like an immediate family member >_>.

Some unexpected System Families you may not have thought of include Dimensions, Views, View Titles and Elevations!

User Families

These are the RFA files that you bring into a project. Much like your extended family, these are the hardest to stay in touch with, get used to and understand. These are the major customization components in Revit. Doors, Windows, Columns, Beams, Plumbing Fixtures, etc. More importantly your detail components, tags and many family types that are nested into system families like Mullion profiles for curtain walls, baluster families for rails and so on. You can start to see how these different family types begin to work with each other.

In-Place Families

Definitely the Red Headed Step Child of Revit families. I say this only because of the love/hate relationship that Revit users have for In-Place families. I know people that use In-Place families exclusively cause all of their projects are 100% one-off custom residential projects. I know some people that create an RFA for a 4″ section of Chair Molding  that will only ever be used in one project simply because of their seething hatred for in-place families. Then there are those of us who preach against In-place families, (but then tell you to use them when you can with their tongue in their cheek while winking).

In-place families are well suited to one of situations that you really wouldn’t benefit from the parametric capabilities or mass use of a User Family. In-place families are also beneficial when you need to create custom families for system family categories, like walls and ceilings, to help better compatibility with other objects of the same category (think wild and crazy bulk head, wall category, but not that easy to model as an actual wall).

SO these are the basic building blocks of Revit. Simple right? See, nothing to this family editor stuff! Well, thanks again for stopping by and I look forward to having you again for another Revit TotD!

.Carl

Embedded DWF Test

Just to have some fun 🙂

Edit: apparently this does not work in WordPress…
Editedit: but does outside of Wrodpress: http://cre8iveThings.com/revit/DWFEmbed.html (note: safari/webkit does not appear to work.)
Editeditedit: also does not work in chrome.. some multi platform tool THIS is turning out to be…

Layouts:

3D:

Rumor has it you have to click and hit spacebar/enter inside the ActiveX object to initiate it before anything works. Let me know!

RevitTotD – 5.4.2011 | Making families are FUN! 1.1

Oh come on.. I’m talking about REVIT families.

*Storytime*

In an interview for a job as a Revit lead at an architectural firm, I was asked: “What do you think your greatest strengths and weaknesses are in what you are applying for?”

Me: “Definitely making families, I am very comfortable making families…” I look up and all three of them have their mouths hanging open.

Me: “Um.. making REVIT families… o.O ”

*/Storytime*

So at request of some fellow chatters I’ve decided to start yet another series of TotDs. I may actually one day finish one of these series. For now I’m thinking this will be a good one to at least get some momentum back up on. There will be a few goals I want to hit along the way:

  1. Familiarize you with Families and their Creation.
  2. Get you started on geometric modeling inside the family creator.
  3. Cover Constraints and geometric parametrics.
  4. Look at the functionality of family parameters and family catalogues.
  5. Differentiate between model and annotation families.
  6. Experiment with Nesting and Shared Parameters.

I will probably NOT get into Conceptual Design Environment families (adaptive components and such) just so I have something to discuss in yes another series down the road. Besides, I think Zach over at Buildz has that pretty well covered. I will probably also avoid covering EVERY single little parameter and detail that is available for family creation. Remember, 5 minute tips!!!

So let’s get started shall we. Let’s keep it simple to begin with. Family Editor, and how to get there 🙂

When I tell people they will be working in the Family Editor, I can sense the panic and fear that ensues. It’s ok, it’s just Revit, with a few different options. To get there we either open a family or start a new family. While I suggest constantly looking at families both out of the box and that others have created (usually to see what NOT to do!) as the best way to learn about families, we’re going to start this series with looking at the new family template options.

From the recent files page you can select new from the families or go old school and go R > New > Family.

So here you are presented with your first “Oh shnap!” moment. That’s a large list of options and a lot of people probably just give up here and go find a book or blog that tells you what to do next. Do not fear. We’ll get to what all these templates mean, but for now let’s just pick the “Generic Model.rft” template.

Tada! Family Editor. DON’T PANIC!!! You’ll notice that your ribbon has some new options that are not available in your normal project mode, and some options are missing, like most of them.

This is basically a Family Creation workspace (if you are familiar with Maya or 3DS, this term should be familiar). As we go through the series you’ll begin to understand why you can’t make walls or schedules in the Family Editor mode (in fact you may be ashamed to remember that at one point this was all alien technology to you!) but for now open a few families that come with Revit and pay attention to their category, available parameters, the geometry, how the views are set up, etc, etc.

I would suggest taking a look at a few families before moving on to the next post just to familiarize yourself with the environment and the options that are available. I can’t speak for you but this is how I learned the best when it came to families; by reverse engineering other families to see what makes them tick.

Until then, thanks for stopping by and I look forward to seeing you around for another RevitTotD!

.Carl

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