New Product! – EKBY TRYGGVE Shelf

In what I’m hoping to become a trend this year, I’m going to start what I’m hoping will end up being like my little (and possibly much larger) Revit version of Apple’s App Store. Yes, it’s just a single product right now, but I’m hoping to add more through out the year. So what’s new about this? Everyone is starting these little family store all over the internet. Well, first, they’re made by me, so you know they’re quality and built right. PLUS, they will al be $0.99.  Yup, every single family I post will be just $0.99.

What does this mean? Well, inexpensive (note, not cheap, just inexpensive!) families for sure, but you get what you buy also. So no, you don’t get free upgrades if I revisit the family down the road. You’ll probably get limited product support if any since I make them as easy to use as possible. However, you will have a new, easier-for-BIM-Manager-to-swallow-on-budget resource for downloading families! Hope you enjoy, and I’ll gladly take requests.

http://cre8iveThings.com/products-page/families/ekby-tryggve-by-ikea/

The EKBY TRYGGVE Wall Shelf is a low cost option of the EKBY storage system by IKEA. Family options include:

  • Version: Revit 2011
  • Wall Hosted
  • Parameters:
    • Instanced Length Parameter
    • Optional Center bar (see manufacturer default lengths)
    • 7″ or 11″ depth types.

IKEA Product website: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30094629

Family renders with default Revit 2011 Materials Library.

Why so sad?

I know, I haven’t posted in a while. Joanna and I are still trying to get settled in to our new place and I still don’t have my laptop back (story later!). In the mean time I thought I would post this conversation I just had over at RevitCity.com. This is the result of trying to explain to someone why it is that UIState.dat HAS to reside on his computer if Revit is up and running

# rkitect : ma3n
# rkitect : everytime you open revit
# rkitect : it says “Hey, UIState.dat. Are you there?”
# rkitect : if UIState.dat doesn’t respond revit says:
# rkitect : “Oh, ok.. well I don’t want you to muss this awesome party so I’m going to teleport a new you here.”
# rkitect : on the other hand if UIState.dat says “Yo Revit, I’m right here, what you want?”
# ** at 12:55 pm Whitcher left the room…
# rkitect : then Revit says “Hey buddy, can’t start the party without you!”
# rkitect : Either way.. if revit is running, then UIState.dat is a file on your computer
# rkitect : revit can’t run without it

…yeah… he still wasn’t convinced 🙁

And now, some more problem solving…

Anyone who thinks that Revit is just too slow really needs to stop griping and start using it more.  It’s kinda like complaining about a manual transmission that keeps dying while you are trying to drive it, on your first time out in a manual transmission car.  I love using Revit to come up with solutions fo design issues, even ones as simple as furniture layout in small spaces.

This model that I’m using for our new place is doing WONDERS for us because not only are we able to see what we do and don’t like in terms of furniture layout, but it’s helping us determine what we will need to sale in order to fit into our new house!

We’ve been able to use it to determine what doesn’t work

What does work

And what’s really close to working!

Of course, that’s not exactly what our furniture looks like, but the sizes are close!

Did I mention that all of this has taken me about 12 hours of time, including renderings AND measuring?…

Thanks Revit!

Revit TotD – 12.2.2010 | Ctrl your Ribbons!

So I really did have a real tip planned for today!  Really and truly I did!  Alas, this was foiled by the Apple store calling and informing me that the new display for my laptop was ready.  Don’t worry, all is ok with the laptop, I just like abusing my AppleCare plan as much as I can at the sign of every little problem (to date I think I’ve had about $1300 of work done on that laptop for the original cost of the plan… which was much less than $1300).  This time it was a slight flicker that may have even been me blinking during a screen refresh… but it looked like a flicker to me and I convinced the Genius that he saw it too >_>.

Anyhow, since not having my computer makes it increasingly difficult to post said “real tip” I have this newfound nugget of information instead!

It’s well known that you can click and drag your panels around within your various ribbons to organize how you see fit.  However, did you know that you can reorganize your actual Ribbon Tabs by holding down control while dragging them around?  Yeah, this was exciting to me at first too!  Then it became daunting.  Yet another excuse for me to go all OCD on my UI.

Thanks for stopping by and hopefully I’ll have my machine back in time for another “real” tip before the end of the week.  Until then, TTFN!

-Carl

Playing with Revit’s Head

I love making Revit think it’s capable of more than it’s capable of doing.

Messing around with some rendering techniques.  What ya think?  Now if I could only remember how I got it to do this… :/

YADWTOTD

That’s, “Yet Another Day Without a Tip of the Day” in case you’re interested.  I’m afraid you college kids and Reviteers in need of a Massing series may have to wait until we get into our new house.  We’ve opted out of hiring professional moving help which means I get to work four jobs for the next month and a half… and only get paid for one of them (yay!…?)

I am however still Reviting and will hopefully still be posting for you a couple times a week.  For instance… today I’m posting a revit model of the house we haven’t moved into yet… maybe I should explain.

I seem to have developed OCD about my interior spaces since beginning using Revit.  Well, that’s not entirely accurate.  Let’s say that Revit has nurtured an already existing OCD of my interior spaces.  Every space that I’ve owned, renter or leased since I’ve known how to use revit has been Revitized for one reason and one reason only… furniture layout.

So here we were, in our soon to be rented house (haven’t even signed the lease agreement) waiting on the new washer and dryer to be delivered (which never showed up) and a perfectly good as-built measuring assistant (hot to boot).  So we whip out a voided check and measure our new home.  Result: perfectly good paint color/furniture layout model!

And there you have it, a perfectly legitimate reason to not have a tip today!  I’ll keep you up to date as I put in some furniture and we make some arrangement and color decisions.  Till then, have a great week!

-Carl

Revit TotD – 11.19.2010 | Oooo Shiny….

Yeah, between being sick.. again… packing and, well… being sick, I haven’t quite been able to put together a good string of TotDs this week so instead… HEY! What’s that over yonder?!!?! *points*

*click for enlarged goodness!*

100% Revit rendering awesomeness…. minus the RPC plants :/

More tips next week, till then, thanks for stopping by!

-Carl

Revit TotD – 11.17.2010 | SPF100 Minimum

Hopefully you spent all weekend playing around with those surfaces and components and patterns cause today we’re going to dive into some of the features behind each of those, beginning with Divided Surfaces!

So as you saw from our last TotD, divided surfaces is the first step to take in turning your mass into something really fun in Revit.  However there are a few things that you should know about when it comes to the properties of that first step into awesomeness.

So this is the infamous UV (get it now?.. the title? *HUYUK*) grid? You can see it’s mouch more complicated than just an XY coordinate system, but to demonstrate the similarities you can turn individual (or both) grids off.

By selecting a surface you can access the Face Manager.

Using the face manager you can rotate the grid…

… partially rotate…

… in multiple directions separately even!

Using the crosshairs you can justify the start point of the grid.

You can also set a lot of this parametrically in the Divided Surface Properties:

Speaking of parameters, I just realized that there’s no way we can fit everything into this one TotD, so I guess we’ll see each other again next time!  Thanks for stopping by and I’ll see you again for the next, Revit TotD

-Carl

Get with it Microsoft…

How come my Apple only uses this much RAM to run Revit?… 😉

Yah.. I wish.  I’d like to thank all the Parallels people that make this fantasy more real than it needed to be… xD

Revit TotD – 11.12.2010 | Divide and Conquer

Wasn’t that a nice break?!  Now back to what we were talking about… what were we talking about?  Oh yea, CDE!  So we’ve had a quick run down of creating masses in CDE and also of cutting holes in them.  You know how to adjust the forms using reference lines and points.  You can join, cut, add and subtract… been practicing?  Good.  So now that we have some point, edges and surfaces, let’s focus on the surfaces.

So today i’m just going to go through some things you can do with surfaces, namely dividing a surface.

  1. Select a mass or a surface (tab through to select just a surface).
  2. Use the Divide Surface tool.

You should really not think of this as a curtain wall system, but more as converting this to a useful surface.  As we explore later in the series, there are a lot of things you can do with this surface, much more than just make it a curtain wall (besides you can do that in the project, why would you do that here?).  Now that we have a divided surface, let’s take a closer look.

If you select the divided surface, you’ll see we have a grid.

This is not to be confused with a curtain wall grid.  This is the surface’s U/V grid… if you don’t know look it up, cause the explanation is beyond this post, long story short, it’s X/Y grid for this surface, but unrelated tot he project’s X/Y.  You can turn this grid off and on…

… you can change the pattern with pre-defined patterns…

… and turn those on and off!

The last neat trick you will learn today is the ability to fill these grids with components.

There you go…. 🙂  Just enough to make you come back next time, right?!  Well, we’ll spend the next few posts going over each of these options and then launch into what we can do with these components!  Thanks again for stopping by and I hope to see you for the next Revit TotD!

-Carl

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