Posts tagged Curtain Wall

Revit TotD – 6.11.09: Curtain Walls.5 | Advanced Curtain Wall Types

OK, so those of you that are here that really know your stuff may start thinking that this isn’t really advanced.  You’re right, but looking back, we started with navigating a freaking curtain wall… this is pretty advanced for those people that are just delving into Revit’s curtain walls; and you guys are doing great for being 5 days in!  So here we are, at the culmination of our curtain wall tips.  So without further adue, let’s delve into our advanced curtain wall! **Please note, I ran out of time at the end of this recording, so it cuts off the “thanks for stopping by, and see you tomorrow.” bit at the end.  I still love you guys, just wanted to let you know since the video cut it off 🙂

Nesting other walls into curtain wall panels:

  1. Select the panel(s) you wish to replace.
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  2. If the panels are part of a predefined curtain wall type, then you need to unpin the panels.
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  3. In the type selection drop down, notice you can select other wall types, even curtain walls.  The only wall you can not place in the panel is the same curtain wall that the panel is already in.
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  4. Each panel has it’s own instance properties as though it were it’s own wall instance.  If you need to make batch changes to the walls, do it before you deselect them.  Play, experiment, have fun!
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You can also attach a curtain wall to a roof/floor just like you can a normal wall:

  1. Select the curtain wall you wish to attach to a surface.
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  2. Choose “Attach” form the options bar.
    1. Be sure you choose top or bottom depending on which end of the wall your host is (ie: Roof is not always going to be top!)
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  3. Choose the host you are attaching to.
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  4. If there are mullions at the top of your curtain wall, Revit will warn you that you are about to delete these mullions.  If that is what you prefer, choose ok.
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Well, that concludes this little mini series on curtain walls.  I hope you took something of value from it.  Don’t worry, there are still plenty of tips to be had here at Tip of the Day central!  So come back tomorrow for yet another TotD!  See ya soon!

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-Carl Gibson

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Revit TotD – 6.10.09: Curtain Walls.4 | Curtain Wall Doors

OK, so by now, if you’re an architect, you’re probably saying “Will you please stop calling it a curtain wall?!?”  No, I will not.  Not because I don’t know that it’s not technically a curtain wall, but because unfortunately curtain wall is what Autodesk decided to call it.  So just know, when I say curtain wall in these tips, I’m not creating a curtain wall necessarily, but instead just using the curtain wall tool!

“That’s great and all, but i still can’t figure out how to put a door in this blasted ‘Curtain Wall!!'”  Oh really now?  Well you’re in luck because that is today’s TotD topic!  Building from yesterday’s tip on fundamental curtain panel blocks, we will go through curtain panel doors today!

Placing Doors in Curtain Walls:

  1. With your curtain wall already in place, select the panel you wish to replace with a door panel.
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  2. Change the panel type from the type selector.
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  3. Use the grid lines to change the dimensions, noting that the dimensions are from GRID LINE to GRID LINE, not from inside of Mullion to inside of Mullion. IE: if you want a 3′ wide door, and your mullions have a 2″ vis line, you want the grids to be 3′-2″ apart.
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  4. You can tag Panel doors just like normal hosted doors, but you will need to create a tag family for panels that looks like your standard door tag.
  5. Using the space bar, you can rotate and change the swing of the door like a normal door.

As usual, I hope this gets you started on the long road that is curtain wall panel doors in Revit.  hope to see you tomorrow as we conclude this little mini series on curtain walls!

-Carl

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Revit TotD – 6.9.09: Curtain Walls.3 | The Curtain Panel

You probably wouldn’t believe me when I told you how many requests I get about how to add doors into curtain walls.  Or maybe you’re one of the many that have struggled with this and would in fact believe me with how many requests I get!  Whichever boat you float in, I’m glad you stopped by; because today, I’m going to show you a few tips on the basic building blocks behind curtain wall panels.

As mentioned in the previous TotD, curtain walls have many components, one being the panel.  The panel is the infill between all the grids in a curtain wall.  The Panels that Revit provides us out of the box are system panels (ie: system families), and can not be edited in the family editor.  You can however, create new curtain panels in the family editor to be used in your projects.

Creating a new curtain wall family:

  1. File > New > Family (or New Family from the recent files page)
  2. Choose the Curtain Panel.rfa template file (this is one of the two family templates that can be used to create curtain panels)
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  3. Notice the reference planes already in place.  Your masses must constrain to these reference planes if you want the panel to work within the grids on your curtain wall.
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  4. You can also use material and other parameters to customize your panel
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A few properties oft he curtain panel to understand:

  1. Instance Parameters
    1. The Instance Parameter window will show you height, width and area of the panel, but you can not change those parameters from this window.
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    2. You can place Marks and comments for each instance if you need them for scheduling purposes.
  2. Type Parameters
    1. This window will affect all instances of this type of panel.
    2. You can place all construction type info, change the finish material and type mark in this window.
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So that does it for today.  This will hopefully give you a nice foundation for the curtain wall doors we will be discussing tomorrow.  Thanks for stopping by, and I hope everyone makes it for tomorrow’s Revit TotD!

-Carl

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Revit Totd – 6.8.09: Curtain Walls.2 | “WHY CAN’T I MOVE GRIDS!??!?”

Heh… I have to laugh at this one.  Here in lies a tip that essentially is the answer for probably 80% of the problems that people have when working with Revit.  This one in particular I see in about 30% of the questions regarding Curtain Walls; “Why can I move the grids in my curtain wall?!”  Yes that’s nice, but if you’ll notice in the PROPERTIES of your curtain wall, you have the vertical and horizontal lines set at a specific distance apart from each other. This means in order to move those pretty little grid lines you just made, you’re going to have to unpin them all and move them.

So in light of this epidemic, I am offering a panacea: Check the properties every once and a while.  More specifically for curtain walls, notice the difference between the presets you have available to you.  Here, let me help!

  1. FIRST THINGS FIRST!  Curtain Walls are what kind of family?… System Family.  You can not load Curtain Families into the project like a normal component.  They are treated within Revit as system families.
  2. Revit comes out-of-the-box with three curtain wall presets:

    Curtain Wall Presets

    Curtain Wall Presets

  3. The difference in these walls can be easily found in the properties for each wall.  Notice the Horizonta/Vertical Distance parameters highlighted in these property boxes.
    Exterior Glazing

    Exterior Glazing

    Curtain Wall 1 (think of it as a clean slate)

    Curtain Wall 1 (think of it as a clean slate)

    Store Front. Notice the Mullion Presets.

    Store Front. Notice the Mullion Presets.

  4. You can add grid lines to a Curtain Wall type with a preset using the Curtain Grid tool mention in the previous tip.  However you can NOT move grids that were generated by the presets until you unlock them.

    You must unpin an automagically generated grid line before moving it.

    You must unpin an automagically generated grid line before moving it.

As usual, be sure to check out the video linked above for a few more tips on what is available in the curtain wall properties.

Thanks again for stopping by and be sure you come back tomorrow for the next tip on this series on curtain walls!  Hope to see you then!

-Carl Gibson

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Revit TotD – 6.5.09: Curtain Wall Series.1 | Navigating the waters.

So this is a first, right?  Maybe the sign of things to come?  I’m doing a series!  Like many of my Tip of the Days, this is the answer to many people that get frustrated from trying to work with Curtain Walls.  This is understandable, as navigating anything consisting of many components can be cumbersome, especially when trying to select the individual components.  In my experience, curtain walls is probably one of the least intuitive tools in revit becuase the fact that the tools needed to create a complete curtain wall are not included in one nice neat package.  You have to create the wall, the insert the grids, then place the mullions on the grids (assuming you are not using a preset curtain wall type).

So to get started down this treacherous road of curtain walls, I present Episode one in the Curtain Wall series; Navigating the Curtain Wall.

Here are some tips on navigatting Revit’s Curtain Walls:

  1. The components of a curtain wall.
    Curtain Wall Object

    Curtain Wall Object

    Curtain grids show a single dashed line when selected.

    Curtain grids show a single dashed line when selected.

    Mullions select similar to a normal revit object.

    Mullions select similar to a normal revit object.

    Curtain panels are the most difficult curtain wall object to select.

    Curtain panels are the most difficult curtain wall object to select.

  2. Remember to use “Tab” to toggle between the objects that sit in the same space.
  3. Adding Grid Lines can be done by using the Curtain Grid tool.  This is under the Modelling Design Bar in 2009 and int he Insert Ribbon bar in 2010.
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  4. Creating mullions on a grid line is done through the Mullions tool just below the Curtain Grid tool (next to it in 2010).
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So there you are.  A quick guideline on navigating your curtain walls.  The video is a much better demonstration of the guidelines than the images, so please watcht he video that is linked above.

Thanks again and see you next time for the next part of this curtain wall series!

-Carl Gibson

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pS:  You may have noticed that I have gone back to Revit 2009 for my demonstartion videos and images.  I am having problems with Revit 2010 performing very slowly  and not even running at all in an x64 environment.  If anyone has any advice on this, please let me know.  Thanks!

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